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Democracy promotion has been a pillar of American foreign policy since the founding of the nation. While democracy is an ideal that unites Americans, spreading it around the world has proven difficult and often divisive. Today, America’s efforts to bring freedom to Iraq and Afghanistan have sent

The World Bank has moved from funding massive public works programs to creating education, health and agriculture programs for developing nations. Despite increasing funding to Asia, Africa and Latin America, the World Bank faces many challenges on producing real long-term results.

Guests

A generation has been born without seeing a normalization of relations between the U.S. and Iran since the 1979 Iran Hostage Crisis. AAM examines how the relationship reached this point and looks deeper into Iran’s growing regional influence in the Middle East. A chasm is growing between Shia

Since 1959, when Fidel Castro’s revolutionary army marched on Havana, Cuba and the United States have co-existed as hostile neighbors. On this edition of America Abroad, we examine the possibility for change in Cuban-American relations after Castro’s death. We'll look back at the role Castro

The American story in the Arab-Israeli conflict began in 1947 with the creation and then recognition of the Jewish state. Since then, the United States has been in some way involved in helping to resolve the conflicts between Israel and Palestine in hopes that it would help stabilize the region

Since the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has held its breath. For more than six decades, diplomacy, fear and luck have helped humanity avoid another atomic attack. But with North Korea's recent nuclear test and Iran's atomic ambitions, the next members of the 'nuclear club' may

Governments around the world are trying to figure out if and how they can help promote entrepreneurship, which is considered critical to global competitiveness. But in the United States, there's nothing more politically contentious than the role of government in the economy.

In this

The days of conventional warfare are numbered and the modern military has to deal with a different kind of warfare: insurgency. What happens when the world's only superpower is faced with insurgents who employ guerrilla tactics? 

On this America Abroad, we examine the insurgencies in Iraq

Ray Suarez travels to Mexico City to explore Mexican attitudes toward America, and the key issues linking our countries, including immigration, free trade and the war on drugs. We also look back at the history of US-Mexico relations, from the raids of Pancho Villa to the signing of NAFTA, and at

Six decades after the world community vowed "never again" to repeat the horrors of the Holocaust, and 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda, the situation in the Darfur region of Sudan is being called "a genocide in slow motion." Over the past three years, more than 200,000 Sudanese have been

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