South Asia

It seems that today you can’t turn on the television (or the radio) without hearing talk of American decline. The country is in the throes of a financial crisis, and grinding through two wars. China, India, Russia and others are sitting at the big kids’ table, and even a recent National Intelligence Council report warns that America’s unipolar moment is over. Others say, not so fast—the US has been declared dead before, but it turns out it was just resting. We take the measure of American power and leadership amid the rise of the rest. 

"I think that public diplomacy has been done as if the channels of communication are the same as the 1980s. They have completely and radically changed, and I think Americans need to understand that the rules of the game have changed." 
–Lahcen Haddad, Professor at Mohammed V University

“One of the most important lessons of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that military success is not sufficient to win.” 
– Secretary of Defense Robert Gates

"In these environments, such as Afghanistan and Iraq, it isn’t a classical war of armies facing each other but rather it is a state and nation building, building institutions that serve the people." 
– US Representative to the U.N. Zalmay Khalilzad

The days of conventional warfare are numbered and the modern military has to deal with a different kind of warfare: insurgency. What happens when the world's only superpower is faced with insurgents who employ guerrilla tactics? 

With Afghans preparing to vote tomorrow to choose a successor to President Hamid Karzai, America Abroad, DC public radio station WAMU 88.5 and Afghanistan channel TOLOnews connected audiences, along with a panel of experts in Washington and Kabul, for an international town hall.

Participants in both cities debated the future of the US-Afghan relationship, women's rights and education, reconciliation with the Taliban, and regional peace and stability as President Karzai steps down and international forces begin to withdraw from the country.

Since the September 11th terrorist attacks, America has ramped up public diplomacy efforts while battling for hearts and minds.  Should the US reach back ot the days of the US Information Agency during World War II?   In this episode of America Abroad, we examine America's international campaign against terrorism in a new kind of war, where successful public diplomacy is as important as military force.   We look at America's image in the world today, the rise of anti-Americanism, and what the US is doing to combat it.  

Guests on this program include:

America Abroad examines the unstable relationship between Pakistan and the United States, how the country has evolved since the partition of 1947, and how the US-Pakistan relationship may change in the wake of 9/11.

Guests on this program include:

Since the September 2001 terrorist attacks and the overthrow of the Taliban regime, the international community has made historic new commitments to the stability and future of Afghanistan. But enormous challenges remain in rebuilding this war-torn country, and the depth of commitment from outside powers is unclear. 

Guests on the program include:

AAM Insight

Country: 
Afghanistan
Egypt
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Jordan
Lebanon
Morocco
North Korea
Pakistan
Palestine
Syria
Turkey

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