South Asia

Is the U.S. losing the global race for the best and brightest entrepreneurial talent? It's the American dream -- move to the United States, start your own business and build a successful life. But, is the U.S. losing the global race for the best and brightest entrepreneurial talent?

In this month's America Abroad, we'll explore the role immigrant entrepreneurs play in the American economy, as well as what other countries are doing to attract foreign talent and lift themselves out of the global recession. This program is part of a four-part series on entrepreneurship.

In this special anniversary episode, A Decade at War: Iraq, Afghanistan & Counterinsurgency, America Abroad looks back at the policies and lessons of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, including the efficacy of the US. counterinsurgency strategy. 

"This is an unfinishable battle. [You] try to do everything, but it is a long war." 
– Gyula Almási, head of Hungary’s Intellectual Property Rights Defense Department

From the Boston Marathon bombings to a recent attack on the Westgate Mall in Kenya, 2013 has seen a spike in terrorism worldwide. Even as the U.S. uses military force to try and weaken Al Qaeda and affiliated groups, it is grappling with how to fight terrorism on another front -- battling the extremist ideas and ideologies that drive the violence. It is a battle that is waged in schools, mosques, community centers and any other place you might find potential terror recruits.

"Seeing them here was actually a sign of the fact that they have moved beyond the religious component and they are serious about doing humanitarian work."
– Giovanni Cassani, head of the camp coordination camp management cluster (CCCM) for the International Organization for Migration

“I had foreign officials saying, 'Why do you Americans care so much about religious freedom?' They'd never run into this with any other governments.”
– John Hanford, former Ambassador-at-Large at the State Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom

"General McChrystal’s plan for counterinsurgency — 50 percent of it is military. The other 50 percent is a development program, or a stabilization program." 
– Andrew Natsios, former USAID Administrator

"The very same strategy that Obama thought he had properly resourced in the winter turns out in McChrystal’s eyes to need 30-40,000 more."
– Michael O’Hanlon, Director of Research and Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, 21st Century Defense Initiative The Sydney Stein, Jr. Chair, Brookings Institution

America Abroad Media (AAM), in partnership with CNN and The George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs, hosted a joint interview with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates on a wide range of issues including the war in Afghanistan, nuclear negotiations with Iran and engagement with Pakistan.

"When I worked in the state department, we made the decision to put diplomats into the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. That's an entirely different proposition than serving in Rome."
– Former Ambassador Nicholas Burns

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