Asia

What does the natural gas boom mean for renewable energy in the U.S. and how are other countries addressing their growing energy needs?

In a world that seems increasingly secular, the role of religion remains surprisingly strong. Across the globe, nearly nine out of 10 people say they have some affiliation with religion. Yet, at the same time, conflicts because of religion are on the rise.

“People value the ability to practice their own religion more highly than they do the ability of others in their country to practice their religion. So you could call that somewhat of a religious intolerance gap.” –Brian Grim, Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion and Public Life

“I had foreign officials saying, 'Why do you Americans care so much about religious freedom?' They'd never run into this with any other governments.”
– John Hanford, former Ambassador-at-Large at the State Department’s Office of International Religious Freedom

It seems that today you can’t turn on the television (or the radio) without hearing talk of American decline. The country is in the throes of a financial crisis, and grinding through two wars. China, India, Russia and others are sitting at the big kids’ table, and even a recent National Intelligence Council report warns that America’s unipolar moment is over. Others say, not so fast—the US has been declared dead before, but it turns out it was just resting. We take the measure of American power and leadership amid the rise of the rest. 

“One of the most important lessons of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that military success is not sufficient to win.” 
– Secretary of Defense Robert Gates

"In these environments, such as Afghanistan and Iraq, it isn’t a classical war of armies facing each other but rather it is a state and nation building, building institutions that serve the people." 
– US Representative to the U.N. Zalmay Khalilzad

It’s the summer of political conventions: Democrats in Denver, Republicans in Minneapolis, and jocks in Beijing. The Olympics are more than just fun and games—they’re also a forum for international politics. China hopes to make its Olympic games the nation’s coming out party. It’s hardly the first time the five-ring spectacle has been the venue for national agendas or grandstanding—think Moscow in 1980 or Hitler’s Berlin. And so far, controversy has surrounded Beijing—Tibet, Darfur, protests, threats of boycotts.

For six decades, Taiwan’s political status has been unresolved. In that time, the small island’s economic dynamism has made it a major player in the global market. But its economic success hasn’t translated into political clout on the international stage. As China’s sphere of influence expands, the island it considers a rogue province is losing friends. Taipei’s occasional gestures towards independence have stroked the ire of China, and the US has backed its democratic ally.

Since the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has held its breath. For more than six decades, diplomacy, fear and luck have helped humanity avoid another atomic attack. But with North Korea's recent nuclear test and Iran's atomic ambitions, the next members of the 'nuclear club' may also be the world's most dangerous states.

Guests on this program include:

Governments around the world are trying to figure out if and how they can help promote entrepreneurship, which is considered critical to global competitiveness. But in the United States, there's nothing more politically contentious than the role of government in the economy.

In this episode of America Abroad, we look at how government intervention helps and hurts entrepreneurs, and we examine what the US can learn from the success and failures of other countries.

The days of conventional warfare are numbered and the modern military has to deal with a different kind of warfare: insurgency. What happens when the world's only superpower is faced with insurgents who employ guerrilla tactics? 

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