US

Public diplomacy efforts have been overshadowed by American foreign policy in Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years. What is America doing to fix this growing problem and is it too late to make a difference?  This episode of America Abroad looks at how engaging foreign audiences has become a prime focus of the US Department of State.  But there seems to be a disconnect between the government’s message and its target audience. 

America’s high hopes for the United Nations have been tempered by frequent frustration. The UN can be inefficient and bureaucratic, and it doesn’t always follow the will of the United States. And yet, for better or worse, the two continue to work together. 

Guests on this program include:

When the Soviet Union collapsed in the early 1990s, there was a chance for cooperation where there had once been conflict. And for a while it seemed friendship might replace the bitter legacy of the Cold War. But 18 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, relations between Washington and Moscow are once again icy.

Guests on this program include:

Since the onset of the Iraq War, the US and Turkey have walked a tight rope to maintain their strained relationship. Turkey’s reluctance to allow the US to transport troops through the country and Turkey’s growing annoyance with America’s inaction against rising violence from the PKK, a Kurdish terrorist group now working out of Iraq, have added to the fray. Turkey’s unique history of secularism since the days of famed leader, Kemal Ataturk, is also slowly eroding with the new government.  

Featuring Special Correspondent Mithat Bereket, Host for CNN Turk. 

Democracy promotion has been a pillar of American foreign policy since the founding of the nation. While democracy is an ideal that unites Americans, spreading it around the world has proven difficult and often divisive. Today, America’s efforts to bring freedom to Iraq and Afghanistan have sent democracy promotion’s stock tumbling to an all time low.

Guests on this episode include:

A generation has been born without seeing a normalization of relations between the U.S. and Iran since the 1979 Iran Hostage Crisis. AAM examines how the relationship reached this point and looks deeper into Iran’s growing regional influence in the Middle East. A chasm is growing between Shia and Sunni Muslims once again and Iran is seeking to capitalize on the region’s growing anti-American sentiment since the Iraq War. 

Guests on this program include:

Since 1959, when Fidel Castro’s revolutionary army marched on Havana, Cuba and the United States have co-existed as hostile neighbors. On this edition of America Abroad, we examine the possibility for change in Cuban-American relations after Castro’s death. We'll look back at the role Castro played in the Cuban Missile Crisis, revisit the history of US-Cuban relations before and after Fidel Castro's communist regime came to power, and examine the role of the Cuban-American community in the formulation of America’s approach to Cuba. 

Guests on the program include:

The American story in the Arab-Israeli conflict began in 1947 with the creation and then recognition of the Jewish state. Since then, the United States has been in some way involved in helping to resolve the conflicts between Israel and Palestine in hopes that it would help stabilize the region. The Bush Administration took a different approach: disengagement. America Abroad takes a deeper look at the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the different approaches to peace in the Middle East. 

Guests on this program include:

Since the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world has held its breath. For more than six decades, diplomacy, fear and luck have helped humanity avoid another atomic attack. But with North Korea's recent nuclear test and Iran's atomic ambitions, the next members of the 'nuclear club' may also be the world's most dangerous states.

Guests on this program include:

Governments around the world are trying to figure out if and how they can help promote entrepreneurship, which is considered critical to global competitiveness. But in the United States, there's nothing more politically contentious than the role of government in the economy.

In this episode of America Abroad, we look at how government intervention helps and hurts entrepreneurs, and we examine what the US can learn from the success and failures of other countries.

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