Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is a religious place. It’s also riddled with disease. AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis prey upon Africa’s faithful, often in the prime of their lives. And anemic public health systems can’t carry the cross. And so, into the valleys of death step medical missionaries. They are welcomed by a continent where prayer and pills often go hand in hand. And, they provide some of the best healthcare in Africa. But sometimes doctrine overrules doctor’s orders, and that can leave patients in limbo.

"General McChrystal’s plan for counterinsurgency — 50 percent of it is military. The other 50 percent is a development program, or a stabilization program." 
– Andrew Natsios, former USAID Administrator

The indictment of the president of Sudan for crimes again humanity has the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the spotlight and it's ratcheted up arguments about the ICC in the court of public opinion. Can the scales of justice balance the pursuit of peace with the need to punish war criminals? 

The UN convention on genocide has been on paper for sixty years, but never put into practice. In 2005, the UN adopted a new idea, the responsibility to protect (R2P). America Abroad traces the evolution and history of R2P and visits the Democratic Republic of the Congo where years of internal conflict and proxy wars brings questions about the limits of R2P and the international community's willingness and ability to protect civilians. 

Does the international community have a moral obligation to intervene more aggressively in Syria? We take a look back at past conflicts - Rwanda, Bosnia, Iraq and Libya - through the eyes of those who both analyzed and experienced these crises first-hand. We also hear from Syrian refugees in Lebanon on the question of Western intervention. 

America’s high hopes for the United Nations have been tempered by frequent frustration. The UN can be inefficient and bureaucratic, and it doesn’t always follow the will of the United States. And yet, for better or worse, the two continue to work together. 

Guests on this program include:

The World Bank has moved from funding massive public works programs to creating education, health and agriculture programs for developing nations. Despite increasing funding to Asia, Africa and Latin America, the World Bank faces many challenges on producing real long-term results.

Guests on this program include:

Six decades after the world community vowed "never again" to repeat the horrors of the Holocaust, and 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda, the situation in the Darfur region of Sudan is being called "a genocide in slow motion." Over the past three years, more than 200,000 Sudanese have been killed and over two million have lost their homes. The crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan has reached a level of violence that has forced people to utter the word “genocide” once again.

Americans, and especially Californians, have had a big dose of severe drought this year. Though it hit the state hard, farmers were the most effected. They continue to worry about the threat the water shortage poses to their multi-million dollar almond, kiwi and walnut crops. The answer has been to irrigate crops with water that is pumped up from underground stores. The problem is that so many farmers are digging so fast and pumping so much water, that the aquifer levels are in danger of depletion. That puts the agriculture industry ultimately at risk.

AK-47s, grenades, water?  Earth's most precious resource doesn't fire bullets or explode but it is guarded, hoarded, and stolen in a way that ignites political tensions on a local level and an international scale.

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